Thur 13-Dec-2018 (7pm ET) – Phylogenomics reveal history of hybridization and polyploidy in Neotropical Rosaceae

Update (4-Dec-2018): We have the pleasure of being joined by lead author Dr. Diego Morales-Briones at our upcoming meeting!

Hello Everyone,

Our final #PlantChat meeting of 2018 is on Thur December 13th at 7pm (ET).

We will be discussing a recent paper that explores different sources of incongruence in the Neotropical Rosaceae genus Lachemilla (Morales-Briones et al. 2018). This paper uses phylogenomics and multiple species tree and species network analyses to resolve the backbone relationships of the genus and reconstruct its reticulate evolutionary history.

Best wishes,
Dr. Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Morales-Briones et al. (2018). Phylogenomic analyses reveal a deep history of hybridization and polyploidy in the Neotropical genus Lachemilla (Rosaceae). New Phytologist 218: 1668-1684. (https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15099)

Lachemilla orbiculata (photo by Dick Culbert; CC BY 2.0)

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 29-Nov-2018 (7pm ET) – Re-run of: Using herbaria to study global change

Hello Everyone,

Due to several scheduling conflicts and sustained interest in the paper, #PlantChat will be re-running Lang et al. (2018) on Thur Nov 29th, 2018, at 7pm (ET).

We will discuss a recent paper that explores how herbaria can be employed in the study of global change (Lang et al. 2018). The authors’ review how herbaria can study the long-term impacts of pollution, habitat change, climate change, and invasive species on plants. The paper provides a lot of thought-provoking discussion on the growing number of uses of herbaria through time, and how to enhance and ensure their continued contributions to science.

Best wishes,
Dr. Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Lang et al. (2018). Using herbaria to study global environmental change. New Phytologist. 2018 Aug 30 [Epub ahead of print]. (https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15401)

Lake_Tekapo_01 Krzysztof Golik CC BY-SA 4.0
Lake Tekapo, New Zealand, with invasive Lupinus polyphyllus (photo by Krzysztof Golik; CC BY-SA 4.0)

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 15-Nov-2018 (7pm ET) – Using herbaria to study global change

Hello Everyone,

After many, many delays, #PlantChat will be back on Thur Nov 15th, 2018, at 7pm (ET). Thanks for your patience!

We will be discussing a recent paper that explores how herbaria can be employed in the study of global change (Lang et al. 2018). This paper reviews how herbaria can study the long-term impacts of pollution, habitat change, climate change, and invasive species on plants.

Best wishes,
Dr. Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Lang et al. (2018). Using herbaria to study global environmental change. New Phytologist. 2018 Aug 30 [Epub ahead of print]. (https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15401)

Lake_Tekapo_01 Krzysztof Golik CC BY-SA 4.0
Lake Tekapo, New Zealand, with invasive Lupinus polyphyllus (photo by Krzysztof Golik; CC BY-SA 4.0)

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 06-Sept-2018 (7pm ET) – Botanical parasitism of an insect

Hello everyone and welcome back!

Thank-you for your patience with the abrupt wrap-up of the summer session. Our first meeting of the fall season of #PlantChat is scheduled for Thur Sept 6th, 2018, at 7pm (ET).

Given the short notice, I thought we would start with a smaller paper on the first recorded interaction of a plant parasitizing an insect, in this case a gall-forming wasp (Egan et al. 2018). The study reports the location and species involved with this novel interaction, including statistics on the negative impacts on galls that are parasitized by the love vine.

The remaining time can be spent catching up and discussing a tentative schedule for the Fall semester.

Best wishes,
Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Egan et al. (2018). Botanical parasitism of an insect by a parasitic plant. Current Biology 28: R863–R864. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2018.06.024)

Cassytha_filiformis_002_by_Scott_Zona
Parasitic love vine, Cassythia filiformis (photo by Scott Zona; CC BY 2.0)

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 14-June-2018 (7pm ET) – Are there too many ferns? Question and Response

(Update 13-June-2018: We have the privilege of being joined by lead author Dr. Eric Schuettpelz. Thanks for joining us!)

Hello Everyone,

Our next meeting is Thur June 14th, 2018, at 7pm (ET).

We will be discussing a pair of question and response papers that debate whether or not there are too many fern genera. This first paper (Schuettpelz et al. 2018) supports the recent classification of nearly 100 systematists (Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group; PPG I) that delineates families and genera on the basis of morphology, molecular data, and the criterion of monophyly. The second paper (Christenhusz & Chase 2018) argues for broader familial and generic concepts for taxonomic stability. In our discussion we will evaluate both of their arguments.

Best wishes,
Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
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Citations: Question: Schuettpelz et al. 2018. Are there too many fern genera? Taxon, published online fast track, 6 June 2018. (https://doi.org/10.12705/673.1)

Response: Christenhusz & Chase (2018). PPG recognizes too many fern genera. Taxon, published online fast track, 6 June 2018. (https://doi.org/10.12705/673.2)

2.6_Fern

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 31-May-2018 (7pm ET) – Convergent evolution in floral shape tied to pollinator shifts

(Update 25-May-2018): We have the privilege of being joined by lead author Dr. Stacey Smith. Thanks for taking the time to join us!

Hello Everyone,

Our next meeting is Thur May 31st, 2018, at 7pm (ET).

We will be discussing a recent paper that investigates the evolution of floral form in Iochrominae (Solanaceae) (Smith & Kriebel 2018). This paper uses morphometrics to demonstrate that convergent evolution in floral shape is tied to pollinator syndrome, and is one of few empirical studies showing this on a macroevolutionary scale.

Best wishes,
Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Smith & Kriebel 2018. Convergent evolution of floral shape tied to pollinator shifts in Iochrominae (Solanaceae). Evolution 72: 688-697. (https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13416)

2.5_Iochroma_CC_BY-SA_3.0_Michael_Becker
Iochroma cyaneum (photo by Michael Becker; CC BY-SA 3.0)

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.

Thur 17-May-2018 (7pm ET) – Drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers

Hello Everyone,

Our next meeting is Thur May 17th, 2018, at 7pm (ET).

We will be discussing a recent paper that investigates the abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae) (Lagomarsino et al. 2016). This paper teases apart the impact of mountain building, climate change, pollination syndrome, and fruit type, on speciation and extinction rates of a rapidly diversifying clade (the centropogonid clade of Campanulaceae subfamily Lobelioideae).

Additionally, we have the privilege of being joined by lead author Dr. Laura Lagomarsino! We are looking forward to this discussion.

Best wishes,
Warren Cardinal-McTeague
#PlantChat Coordinator
– – – – – – – – – –
Citation: Lagomarsino et al. 2016. The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae). New Phytologist 210: 1430-1442.(https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.13920)

2.4_Bellflowers

#PlantChat, an Online Biweekly Botany Journal Club! This is an open online discussion group framed around plant systematics, with the aim of circulating through related subjects on evolution, biogeography, ecology, conservation, genomics, and more! When possible, we like to invite authors to discuss their paper. Meetings usually occur every second Thursday at 7pm ET over Google Hangouts. #PlantChat was originally designed to build an accessible online community where botanists from smaller research groups could connect and discuss topics of interest. Members include a mix of students, postdocs, researchers, and professors, united by their passion for plants. If you’re interested in joining, send an email using the contact form or a DM through Twitter.